Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di Ethiopian

Messaggio da leggereda malpensante » mer 11 set 2019, 20:39:37

Boeing pensa che il MAX tornerà in servizio negli USA a novembre

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/b ... countries/
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Re:Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda D960 » mer 11 set 2019, 23:09:15

malpensante ha scritto:Boeing pensa che il MAX tornerà in servizio negli USA a novembre

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/b ... countries/



Negli USA è necessario che ritorni a volare il prima possibile per far vedere che il danno è stato sistemato anche se tardivamente. Tuttavia non saprei se l'EASA e le altre agenzie varie siano così favoreli ad un'introduzione immediata e mi aspetto che prima vedano se effettivamente la macchina funzioni e solo successivamente valutare di far spiccare il volo nuovamente all'aereo infausto.
BLQ-BGY-CAG-DUB-FCO-GOA-GRO-KBP-MXP-MUC-OLB-PSA-STN-TBS-TPS-TRN-TRS-TSF-VCE

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » gio 12 set 2019, 07:43:10

Le obiezioni di EASA sono un po' più strutturali. Si dice insomma che ormai sul 737 esiste un sistema che controlla, anche solo in parte il comportamento dinamico dell'aereo. Sul A320 tutto il comportamento su 6 assi è affidato a un software quindi si richiedono 3 sensori di aoa per sicurezza. Il 737 ne ha due quindi è più prono a guasti. A sua volta allora EASA dice: dato che il sistema non è immune da guasti, ma se perdi un sensore si disabilita, fammi vedere che l'aereo è gestibile anche senza in condizioni normali e senza l' MCAS.

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » lun 16 set 2019, 08:05:55

Da copia di flight international in mio possesso

Boeing has acknowledged that some non-US regulators will want to conduct their own reviews of the 737 Max, potentially threatening the company's timeline for service return.

Boeing chief executive Dennis Muilenburg, speaking on 11 September, said the airframer continues "targeting" the aircraft to receive regulatory clearance to fly "early in the fourth quarter".

But he concedes "alignment" among regulators worldwide, notably in Europe, could make that target difficult to achieve on a global basis.

He notes the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) "has brought up some questions… we are working our way through," including queries about the 737 Max's angle-of-attack system.

"It creates timeline uncertainty," Muilenburg adds. "A phased ungrounding of the airplane among regulators around the world is a possibility."

On 3 September, Patrick Ky, EASA executive director, confirmed the agency would make its own judgement on whether the 737 Max was safe to fly again.

It is still awaiting satisfactory answers about safety-critical parts not limited to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System.

Although progress has been made since EASA raised those concerns with Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in July, "there are aspects on which we're happy with the solutions proposed by Boeing, others on which we need to discuss more, and others on which there is still a lot of work that needs to be performed", Ky says.

The agency says it will want to conduct its own flight tests, using its own pilots, separate from those performed by the FAA.

EASA informed Boeing on 1 April that it would only clear the Max for a return to service if four conditions were met, which has yet to happen, says Ky. The criteria are: all design changes must be approved by EASA; a broader review of all safety-critical systems must be carried out; the agency is satisfied the two fatal crashes involving the type are "sufficiently understood"; and 737 Max flightcrews must be "adequately trained" in respect of changes to the aircraft.

Ky says the Max systems EASA has focused on comprise "displays, alerting systems, autopilot and air data systems" and the agency has decided to recertify those "safety-critical" parts.

It communicated "70 test points" on 22 May, covering normal and abnormal operating conditions, and simulator evaluations were completed in June and July.

"On our findings, we found significant technical issues [with the 737 Max]," Ky says. These included "a lack of exhaustive monitoring of the system failures, resulting in stabiliser runaway; too high forces needed to move the manual trim wheel in case of a stabiliser runaway; too late disconnection of autopilot near stall speed (in specific conditions); and too high crew workload in some failure cases".



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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda I-Alex » sab 21 set 2019, 15:09:23

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » mar 24 set 2019, 18:14:45

Da copia di flight international in mio possesso
It was on 13 March this year that the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ordered the grounding of Boeing's 737 Max, making it the final regulator to ban flights with the re-engined narrowbody as a safety crisis snowballed.

The grounding was triggered by the 10 March crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8, which itself came almost six months after the October 2018 crash of a Lion Air 737-8; a combined 346 people were killed in the disasters, both of which are believed to have been triggered by erroneous activation of an automated system.

Six months after the FAA's decision, the Max remains grounded and there is no certainty as to when it will return to service.

Boeing has targeted September to submit new certification material to US regulators for approval. The airframer may meet that goal, and the company is sticking by its expectation that the grounding will be lifted in the fourth quarter.

But as October approaches, the return-to-service path remains muddled amid open investigations and signals suggesting some of the world's civil aviation regulators, notably the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), will re-approve the Max at their own pace.

On 11 September, Boeing chief executive Dennis Muilenburg told attendees to an investor conference that Boeing has been "working through" delivering certification materials to the FAA as part of an "iterative process".

Those materials relate to 737 Max flight-control software, training materials and "other certification documents", he said.

"All of that work supports our timeline for an early fourth quarter return to service," Muilenburg said.

But in a move that highlights the complications for Boeing, on 12 September, the US House of Representatives' transportation committee disclosed it had written Muilenburg a letter "to formally request interviews with several Boeing employees".

That demand was made ahead of another planned, and newly disclosed, hearing related to its investigation into the 737 Max, although the date for that session has not yet been set.

"The committee believes certain employees may be able to shed light on issues central to the committee's investigation, including information about the design, development and certification of the 737 Max," the committee says.

Boeing had already "provided substantial documents to the committee over the past several months and shared its senior management's perspective with the committee," the committee says.

But certain of the airframer's employees "can provide unique insight into specific issues and decisions in a way that senior Boeing management simply cannot."

The committee declines to provide FlightGlobal with a copy of the letter to Muilenburg, or to specify the names or titles of the employees it seeks to interview.

"Once these aircraft are finally offered for delivery in 2020 or perhaps even 2021, will that capital still be available to finance those aircraft? And even more fundamentally, will the airline customers envisaged for these aircraft still want them in that timescale?" Rob Morris, head of consultancy, Ascend by Cirium

Boeing says: "We're deeply disappointed the committee chose to release private correspondence given our extensive cooperation to date. We will continue to be transparent and responsive to the committee."

Boeing has been criticised by some observers for a lack of transparency and for not adequately addressing the role its systems played in two crashes.

The first, a Lion Air 737-8, went down on 29 October last year. Then the Ethiopian aircraft crashed in March, prompting first China, and then the rest of the world, to ground the Max aircraft family. Investigations have suggested the 737 Max's Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System - technology created for the Max to make the aircraft handle in the same way as earlier-generation 737NGs - played a central role in both crashes.

EASA confirmed this week that it intends to scrutinise the 737 Max itself, and to conduct its own test flights, rather than rubber stamp the FAA's approval.

EASA said it is reviewing numerous concerns about the aircraft, including those related to the angle-of-attack indicator (specifically, the fact that the 737 has only two such devices), manual horizontal trim and flightcrew responses to emergencies.

Muilenburg addressed EASA's intentions at the 11 September investor conference, saying Boeing is working closely with that agency, but conceding a "phased ungrounding" may play out.

In such a scenario, the FAA might approve the aircraft first, followed by regulators in Europe, China and possibly elsewhere. When approval from China might come is unknown, not least because the country - the first to ground the Max - is currently embroiled in a trade war with the USA.

Michel Merluzeau, director of aerospace consultancy AIR, thinks the likelihood of a return to service in the fourth quarter will become clearer next month.

"I think it's safe to say that by the end of October we should have a much better understanding of the timeline," he says. Much remains uncertain, but Merluzeau sees a path by which the FAA could lift the grounding in the fourth quarter - possibly in November or December.

Faced with this uncertainty, airlines have removed 737 Max flights from their schedules in incremental chunks, with many carriers now seeing January 2020 as the likely return date.

Only a small number of Max - those coming off Boeing's production line - will likely be flying immediately after the grounding lifts. Months may pass before the aircraft currently in storage return to service. Indeed, Air Canada chief financial officer Michael Rousseau said on 12 September that a year might pass before that airline gets its 50 planned 737 Maxes back in service.

The airline has about 400 trained 737 Max pilots - enough to operate its pre-grounding fleet of 24 aircraft, but not enough to operate additional, newly-manufactured 737 Max that will be available when the grounding lifts, he says.

That pilot shortage is exacerbated for Air Canada because it flies no earlier-generation 737s, meaning it has no pilots that can undergo a conversion course onto the Max.

"We will have to work with Boeing as to when we bring those planes in, because we have no pilots to fly those planes, at this point," Rousseau says.

At the time of the grounding 383 737 Max aircraft were in commercial use by 53 operators, with 30 of those flying five or more of the type, analysis by consultancy Ascend reveals.

"Forty of those airlines have added 278 passenger jets to their fleet since the grounding. That means that there are 13 airlines - that's 25% of all of the operators - that have actually not made any additions to their fleet to cover the Max [grounding]. There are some significant operators in that group - Aerolineas Argentinas, Copa Airlines, flydubai, SilkAir, Southwest Airlines are five examples," says Rob Morris, head of consultancy at Ascend

"These airlines are largely using their existing aircraft more intensively or dropping routes or frequencies from their networks to mitigate the loss of the Max for now."

Of the jets brought in as cover, 207 are used aircraft and unsurprisingly the majority - 169, or 82% of them, are single-aisles, with an average age of 13.5 years; 62 (30%) of the single-aisles are 15-plus years old.

"Many of these are wet-leased but many are also aircraft that have seen short-term (or longer) new leases when they may otherwise have been headed for part-out. This data also doesn't take into account any lease extensions," says Morris.

"Clearly the grounding has for now created some short-term positive halo for mid-life aircraft leasing and once we have resolution there may well be quite a number of aircraft in the market which airlines will suddenly no longer require."

Boeing's halting of 737 Max deliveries also means the industry will fail to hit its annual shipment target, says Morris. Around 1,400 single-aisles were expected to have been handed over during 2019; by November, the deficit will be almost 470 aircraft and if Max deliveries remain paused that figure will be more than 500 aircraft by year-end.

The financial impact on Boeing is clear, but the effects of the grounding ripple outwards: "These are 500 aircraft which were expected to be financed in 2019, and we are already seeing leasing companies report lower capital expenditure on the back of non-delivery.

"Once these aircraft are finally offered for delivery in 2020 or perhaps even 2021, will that capital still be available to finance those aircraft? And even more fundamentally, will the airline customers envisaged for these aircraft still want them in that timescale?" says Morris.

Despite the grounding - and possibly in the hope of it being of a short duration - Boeing has continued to produce the 737 Max, albeit at a lower rate of 42 aircraft per month. Based on that output level - and the delivery of the final 737NG in June - around 250 aircraft have been stored by the airframer.

But if the grounding continues, clearly that number will only go one way: "Under our working assumption of return to service in November, Boeing could have more than 350 aircraft completed and ready for customer delivery.

"Boeing's best ever month for 737 deliveries was in December 2018, when it handed over 69 aircraft to customers. Clearly there are infrastructure constraints both from an airline perspective - demand, finance and team to accept aircraft - and Boeing, but they will have to run many months at December 2018 levels or better if they are to get all of these aircraft delivered in a relatively timely manner," says Morris.

"Rather, it seems likely that we will have to prepare for an elongated period of 737 Max parked aircraft before the production backlog can be finally delivered sometime in late 2020 or more likely in 2021 or beyond."

Morris notes that operating lessors may also feel future pressure from the crisis: today, 45% of the stored fleet is managed by lessors, who also account for 24% of the firm order backlog.

"Amongst these 1,050 aircraft, we estimate there are some 140 scheduled for delivery in 2020, plus 190 the following year, for which we do not have an end user yet identified.

"At the time of the grounding in March Ascend was hearing talk of significant negative pressure on lease rates as a consequence of this volume of lessor speculative order aircraft, and although deliveries have moved backwards it seems that this pressure will again re-exert once the grounding has lifted," he says.




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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » ven 27 set 2019, 08:29:57

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/b ... ssion=true

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda easyMXP » ven 27 set 2019, 09:06:40

kco ha scritto:https://www.seattletimes.com/business/boeing-aerospace/ntsb-faults-boeing-tests-of-max-system-for-not-assessing-pilot-response-to-multiple-alerts/?amp=1&__twitter_impression=true

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Analisi ineccepibile dal NTSB, ma altro chiodo piantato sulla bara del Max.
Praticamente un aereo realizzato con la toppa sulla toppa della toppa, a furia di aggiunte senza cambiare l'avionica di base questa è diventata inadeguata a gestire tutti i sistemi più moderni aggiunti nel frattempo.

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » sab 28 set 2019, 11:22:28

Da copia di flight international in mio possesso


Boeing aims to deliver up to 70 737 Max aircraft monthly to clear its backlog once the grounding is lifted, FlightGlobal has learned.

The manufacturer has not discussed publicly its plans for the profile or sequence of deliveries across its production line and the estimated 250-plus aircraft that have been built since deliveries were suspended on 13 March.

Boeing said very little about the 737 Max situation during the recent ISTAT EMEA conference in Berlin, but customer sources indicate once the grounding is lifted the manufacturer will focus efforts on delivering brand-new aircraft off the Renton production line, while simultaneously beginning the process to ship the stored but undelivered aircraft. 

In parallel with this will be the programme supporting operators returning the more than 370 delivered-but-grounded Max aircraft to flight.

The Renton production line is currently building 42 737s per month and FlightGlobal understands that Boeing aims to begin delivering straight from the line at that rate while shipping a total of 60-70 aircraft a month; the balance will be made up if the undelivered airframes currently in storage. 

The single highest monthly delivery total ever on the 737 series was 69 units in December last year.

Once deliveries recommence, Boeing aims to ramp output to the previously announced rate of 57 per month during 2020.



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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » sab 28 set 2019, 11:23:18

Da copia di flight international in mio possesso


Jose Luis Magana/AP/Shutterstock

One of Boeing’s many challenges in the wake of the twin 737 Max ­disasters is how the company should ­reshape its internal systems to ­ensure the errors that led to the crashes – whether of omission or commission – are not ­repeated. 

An independent panel has recommended a raft of changes, which the airframer’s board has now agreed to adopt. 

Engineers will no longer be siloed in Boeing’s three divisions – instead they will see their roles reinforced,  and will now report into a head of engineering, who will then report to the company’s chief executive. 

In addition, a newly-created “Product and Services Safety” division will review all aspects of aircraft safety. Crucially, this will provide employees with a means of raising safety concerns, particularly around “undue pressure”. 

While nothing can guarantee that a Boeing airliner will never crash again, these proposals go some way to addressing the systemic failings apparently ­present at the manufacturer. 

Creating these new structures and ­processes is all well and good, but ­Boeing’s internal watchdogs must have teeth: there is little point setting up a new body if it has no power to intervene in the product development process. 

Additionally, while any corporation is clearly there to make money, the pursuit of profit must not be allowed to trump safety concerns. 

At Boeing, new bodies are being created and procedures are being set up to the sound of the stable door slamming shut and the sound of hooves galloping into the distance.

However, if those changes prevent another tragedy, some good will have been achieved.



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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » sab 28 set 2019, 13:19:57

Peccato che l'articolo non riporti quale fosse la catena di controllo, comando e autorizzazione prima degli incidenti, per poter fare un confronto.

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » lun 30 set 2019, 08:40:43

Boeing seems set to undergo a broad internal overhaul to conform with several safety recommendations handed down by the company’s board of directors.

The recommendations stem from an independent safety review panel Boeing formed in the wake of two 737 Max crashes.

Following a five-month evaluation, the board has now approved the panel’s findings.

Under the recommendations, Boeing should “realign” its engineering function so that staff report directly to a chief engineer, who reports to the airframer’s chief executive, Dennis Muilenburg.

That marks a major shift for Boeing, whose engineers are siloed within the company’s commercial aircraft, global services and defence business units.

Those changes will strengthen Boeing’s engineering function and ensure greater emphasis on safety, says the board.

In addition, it also urges the airframer to create a product and services safety division that would report to senior executives and the board’s newly formed Aerospace Safety Committee.

The manufacturer announced the formation of that committee on 25 September.

The new product and services safety division would review “all aspects of product safety, including investigating cases of undue pressure” and other employee concerns, Boeing says.

It would also oversee Boeing’s “organisation designation authorisation” (ODA) team – the internal group that performs some certification work under approval from the US Federal Aviation Administration.

Like the firm’s engineers, Boeing’s ODA teams also now report within the company’s separate business units.

Additionally, the board calls for Boeing to broadly review its cockpit designs with the goal of ensuring its flightdecks are best suited for today’s pilots.

Boeing’s senior management is considering adopting the organisational recommendations, but has yet to provide a timetable for the changes. Safety and industry analysts believe the changes will be positive, but point out that Boeing’s response needs to be comprehensive and wholehearted.

“It’s an improvement, but they’ve got an awful lot of work to do,” says former National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) member John Goglia, now an aerospace safety consultant.

To be effective, Boeing’s new unit must bring a safety-first­ ­culture to the whole organisation, broadly promote its goals within the company and encourage employees to report concerns, he says.

“The question is, will there be actions to follow?” asks former NTSB chairman James Hall.

He views Boeing’s move partly as an effort to “control the process” – to get ahead of future ­recommendations that could be generated by other investigations, including the review of the 737 Max’s certification being conducted by the US Department of Transportation’s inspector general.

Aerospace analyst Michel Merluzeau of consultancy AIR thinks the board’s recommendations could spur Boeing to make much-needed updates to its cockpits and cockpit systems.

“It’s about time,” he says. “I have always thought that Boeing… was stuck a bit behind Airbus in terms of flightdeck and flight-control philosophy for too long.”

Boeing has a reputation for designing “pilot-centric” cockpits that leave more control in the hands of pilots, while Airbus’s designs rely more on automated systems intended, at least partly, to prevent dangerous manoeuvres from being performed.

Merluzeau hopes Boeing consults not just long-time 737 customers like Alaska Airlines and Southwest Airlines, but also smaller carriers in other regions, where pilots may have less 737 or A320 cockpit time.

“The highest level of competency should not drive the design,” Merluzeau adds. “Unfortunately, the lowest common denominator should be one of several considerations in flightdeck technology.”

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » mar 01 ott 2019, 08:32:30

Da copia di flight international in mio possesso


Singapore’s SilkAir has been given the go-ahead by Australia’s civil aviation safety regulator to move its grounded Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft from the island state to Alice Springs for storage.

In a 23 September notification, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) says that it has lifted a temporary prohibition of 737 Max operations in Australian airspace.

The Singapore Airlines subsidiary has six 737 Max 8s, ­Cirium fleets data records.

In its notice, CASA states that the aircraft can only be operated on an “authorised flight” – for “non-commercial” purposes such as for flight testing, storage, maintenance or repairs.

The 737 Max aircraft will also operate without their Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS), the software that has been implicated in the two fatal 737 Max crashes which led to the type’s global grounding.

SilkAir will have a six-month deadline by which to ferry the aircraft to Alice Springs.

The carrier’s plan to store the Max was first reported by the Financial Times, which said SilkAir will transfer the narrowbodies to a facility operated by Asia Pacific Aircraft Storage (APAS).

APAS managing director Tom Vincent declines to comment on the SilkAir move, but says the company is “in discussions” with a number of airline customers regarding 737 Max storage.

While efforts are being made to return the narrowbody to service, there is no clear indication when this might take place.



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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda malpensante » mer 02 ott 2019, 15:58:55

Boeing Engineer, in Official Complaint, Cited Focus on Profit Over Safety on 737 Max

By Natalie Kitroeff, David Gelles and Jack Nicas
Oct. 2, 2019
Updated 9:44 a.m. ET


A senior Boeing engineer filed an internal ethics complaint this year saying that during the development of the 737 Max jet the company had rejected a safety system to minimize costs, equipment that he felt could have reduced risks that contributed to two fatal crashes.

Boeing has provided the complaint, which was reviewed by The New York Times, to the Department of Justice as part of a criminal investigation into the design of the Max, according to a person with knowledge of the inquiry who requested anonymity given the ongoing legal matter. Federal investigators have questioned at least one former Boeing employee about the allegations, said another person with knowledge of the discussions who similarly requested anonymity.

It is unclear what, if any, assessment investigators have made of the complaint.

The complaint, filed after the two crashes, builds on concerns about Boeing’s corporate culture, as the company tries to repair its reputation and get the planes flying again.

Many current and former Boeing employees have privately discussed problems with the design and decision-making process on the 737 Max, outlining episodes when managers dismissed engineers’ recommendations or prioritized profits. The engineer who filed the ethics concerns this year, Curtis Ewbank, went a step further, lodging a formal complaint and calling out the chief executive for publicly misrepresenting the safety of the plane.

During the development of the 737 Max, Mr. Ewbank worked on the cockpit systems that pilots use to monitor and control the airplane. In his complaint to Boeing, he said that managers were urged to study a backup system for calculating the plane’s airspeed. The system, known as synthetic airspeed, draws on several data sources to measure how fast a plane is flying.

Such equipment, Mr. Ewbank said, could detect when the angle-of-attack sensors, which measure the plane’s position in the sky, were malfunctioning and prevent other systems from relying on that faulty information. A version of the system is used on Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner, a new model of plane.

Mr. Ewbank did not respond to requests for comment. Peter Carr, a spokesman for the Department of Justice, declined to comment on the complaint.

In both crashes of the Max, an angle-of-attack sensor is believed to have failed, sending bad data to automated software designed to help prevent stalls. That software, known as MCAS, then activated erroneously, sending the planes into irrecoverable nose dives.

Mr. Ewbank noted in the complaint, “It is not possible to say for certain that any actual implementation of synthetic airspeed on the 737 Max would have prevented the accidents” in Ethiopia and Indonesia. But he said that Boeing’s actions on the issue pointed to a culture that emphasized profit in some cases, at the expense of safety.

Throughout the development of the Max, Boeing tried to avoid adding components that could force airlines to train pilots in flight simulators, costing tens of millions of dollars over the life of an aircraft. Significant changes to the Max could also have required the more onerous approval for a new plane, rather than the streamlined certification process for a derivative model.

According to Mr. Ewbank’s complaint, Ray Craig, a chief test pilot of the 737, and other engineers wanted to study the possibility of adding the synthetic airspeed system to the Max. But a Boeing executive decided not to look into the matter because of its potential cost and effect on training requirements for pilots.

“I was willing to stand up for safety and quality, but was unable to actually have an effect in those areas,” Mr. Ewbank said in the complaint, adding, “Boeing management was more concerned with cost and schedule than safety or quality.”

His account, and the description of the system’s benefits on the 787 Dreamliner, was backed up by a former senior Boeing employee involved in the discussions who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the continuing Justice Department investigation. The former Boeing employee, who worked on the Max, confirmed that executives had discussed the system. The employee said they had determined that trying to install such new technology onto the 737 Max, a plane based on a 1960s-era design, would be too complicated and risky for the project, which was on a tight development schedule.

But the former Boeing employee said that Mr. Ewbank’s complaint overstated the importance of such a system and understated the complexity of adding it to the 737 Max. This employee said that Boeing had only installed the system on the 787 Dreamliners, noting that it was unclear how or whether the Max could similarly calculate synthetic airspeed, because it has fewer sensors. The employee also did not recall Boeing executives citing the potential impact on pilot training when deciding not to study adding the system.

A Boeing spokesman, Gordon Johndroe, said in a statement, “Safety, quality and integrity are at the core of Boeing’s values.”

“Boeing offers its employees a number of channels for raising concerns and complaints and has rigorous processes in place, both to ensure that such complaints receive thorough consideration and to protect the confidentiality of employees who make them,” he added.

Mr. Ewbank worked as an engineer at Boeing from 2010 to 2015, and was generally well regarded by his colleagues, according to two people with knowledge of his work who requested anonymity to discuss a sensitive internal inquiry. In Mr. Ewbank’s complaint, he said he had left the company in part because he had become concerned that the company was not prioritizing safety. He returned to the company in 2018, where he is now working on the development of a new 777.

Mr. Ewbank said that he did not initially file a complaint during the development of the Max, in part because the “fear of retaliation is high.”

He stepped forward this year, he explained in the complaint, because of the “ethical imperative of an engineer — to protect the safety of the public.”

“Boeing is not in a business where safety can be treated as a secondary concern,” Mr. Ewbank wrote in the complaint. “But the current culture of expediency of design-to-market and cost cutting does not permit any other treatment by the work force tasked with making executive managements’ fever dreams a reality.”


https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/02/busi ... mbfY9cWFQo
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda malpensante » ven 04 ott 2019, 08:23:15

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mattaus313
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda mattaus313 » ven 04 ott 2019, 08:34:28

Sul fatto che Boeing sta raschiando sempre di più il fondo con questa vicenda penso che non ci sia più nulla da dire, però questo passaggio riporta alle vicende di cronaca attuali



The submission from Boeing then cited an estimate of the cost of full compliance at more than $10 billion.



Si lamentano dei 7.5 bn della UE ad Airbus, ma non sono anche questi «aiuti»? (Per giunta costati ben di più dell'importo in euro o dollari che sia)

È ora di far fare pace col cervello agli americani, fargli buttare nel cesso quel programma e ripartire da capo. Altroché dazi.
"Because you needed a lot of capital in an airline, you needed to be where the financial markets were, and obviously that's New York"

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » ven 04 ott 2019, 10:34:13

Una vecchia storiella dice che nella cabina dell'aeroplano del futuro troveranno posto solo un pilota e un cane: il pilota per dare da mangiare al cane e il cane per mordere il pilota se quest'ultimo cerca di toccare qualcosa.

Scherzi a parte, credo che nel corso degli anni la spinta per il progresso tecnico nel campo dell'aviazione sia man mano scivolata dall'obiettivo di avere un prodotto tecnologicamente migliore, più prestante e più sicuro, a quello di una continua riduzione dei costi a vantaggio del produttore e dell'operatore. Il caso del MAX ne è la prova più evidente, come le notizie che trapelano mese dopo mese confermano. Sulla base di quanto si sa finora questa è la situazione:
1) Per prolungare ulteriormente la vita di un velivolo con decise limitazioni di progetto, allungandolo e installando nuovi motori, Boeing ha dovuto far affidamento al sistema MCAS per ovviare a problemi aerodinamici. Il MCAS non è nuovo ed è testato - è utilizzato ad esempio anche sulle aerocisterne basate sul 767 - ma per risparmiare in produzione si è deciso di dotarlo di un solo sensore e di semplificarlo. Si potevano utilizzare in aggiunta altri sistemi di controllo già disponibili, ma i costi sarebbero aumentati. I risultati si sono visti.
2) Per evitare la riprogettazione della cabina secondo gli ultimi standard di sicurezza, intesi in senso lato, con la complicità della FAA Boeing ha affermato che la cosa non era possibile e non era comunque necessaria, viste le positive statistiche della flotta di 737 in servizio. Quanto questo assunto fosse fallace lo si è visto con due incidenti accaduti. Anche qui, per risparmiare qualcosa all'inizio e far felici subito gli azionisti, si spenderà molto di più e gli azionisti facilmente avranno poco da gioire. Per non parlare delle vittime.
3) Per agevolare le vendite, Boeing ha dichiarato e fatto credere agli acquirenti che non occorresse alcun investimento per la certificazione dei piloti. Se sapevano pilotare un 737NG potevano pilotare anche un MAX. Niente corsi, niente simulatore, niente nuova manualistica o quasi, niente di niente. Un grande risparmio. Acquirenti contenti, venditori pure. Purtroppo la realtà si è mostrata ben diversa, con piloti che non sono stati in grado di reagire adeguatamente all'emergenza quando si è presentata.

Se il 737 MAX sia definitivamente morto non lo so, ma sicuramente non ha un brillante futuro davanti a sé. Non sono neanche certo che Boeing riuscirà a conservare il backlog esistente. Dalle parti di Seattle farebbero bene a pensare a un sostituto, e in fretta.

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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda malpensante » ven 04 ott 2019, 11:22:12

Ieri alla conferenza stampa di Ryanair Leonard Berberi del Corriere ha fatto notare che sulla copertina (verde) della brochure campeggiava un bel MAX. Il nuovo CEO ha risposto che è l’aereo più verde e tornerà in servizio fra gennaio e febbraio, che era solo un problema di software, ormai risolto e che manca solo la certificazione.

Non volendo contrariarli apertamente io ho chiesto se sono sicuri che la gente volerà tranquilla sul MAX. Nessun dubbio. Ma la gente è irrazionale, ho replicato. Nessun dubbio. Vedremo come andrà a finire.
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » sab 05 ott 2019, 11:07:32

Boeing ha fatto un errore fatale nel non riuscire a predire il A320 neo che era un aereo che metteva assieme le prestazioni dei nuovi motori sviluppati per l odierno A220 con una commonality spinta rispetto al ceo. Airbus era nella posizione di poter entrare sul mercato in tempo brevi. Andava capito e andava anticipata con un nuovo prodotto, un 797. Una volta che l A320 neo è stato lanciato era già tardi, un nuovo prodotto sarebbe arrivato troppo in là e non si può certo correre ai ripari adesso. Il grosso del risparmio lo fanno i motori e una tecnologia sufficientemente nuova verrà fuori solo fra 5-10 anni. L sfc migliora del 1% ogni anno in media e l'industria aeronautica accetta un nuovo prodotto solo se questo ti fa risparmiare almeno un 15% rispetto a quello che aveva prima. Le strutture in carbonio ti possono o dare un 5-7% il resto lo devi cavar fuori dai motori.
Boeing si è condannata a un ruolo gregario sui narrow body per il prossimo decennio con percentuali di mercato sotto il 40% quando ha sempre raggiunto la parità fino al NG.
Io credo che alla fine il max tornerà a volare ma non sarà certo ricordato come un capolavoro.
Chiaro che un nuovo aereo succederà al 737 e questo avverrà prima di quanto preventivato. Almeno questo è quello che si dice dalle parti di toulouse. Però non sarà questione di domani.
La nuova sfida saranno strutture in carbonio prodotte in quantità massicce per supportare 60-100 aerei al mese e tutti si stanno preparando.

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kco
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » sab 05 ott 2019, 11:07:42

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... er-461172/

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KittyHawk
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » sab 05 ott 2019, 13:56:51

kco ha scritto:La nuova sfida saranno strutture in carbonio prodotte in quantità massicce per supportare 60-100 aerei al mese e tutti si stanno preparando.

Non necessariamente il cambiamento sarà scandito dall'introduzione di nuovi materiali, bensì dalla crescente automatizzazione nelle fabbriche. Il tempo in cui gli operai facevano tutto a mano sta volgendo al termine anche nell'industria aeronautica. Ormai moltissimi anni fa Boeing iniziò a usare un enorme macchinario per pitturare le ali del 747 messe in verticale. In tempi più recenti per il 737 si è adottata la catena di lavoro fordista in continuo movimento. Pochi giorni fa Airbus ha inaugurato un sistema completamente automatizzato per l'assemblaggio delle strutture dell'A320 (https://www.airbus.com/newsroom/press-releases/en/2019/10/airbus-inaugurates-new-a320-structure-assembly-line-in-hamburg.html). Dove prima si avevano diversi operai al lavoro ora ci sono una ventina di robot che effettuano tutte le operazioni necessarie. Se uno ha in mente le immagini di Rosie the Riveter, o anche quelle del taglio delle lamiere del Concorde, si rende conto di come le cose siano cambiate.
L'automazione è finora rimasta abbastanza lontana dalle fabbriche aeronautiche a causa della, o grazie alla, produzione limitata. Ora grazie alla, o a causa della, crescente domanda e flessibilità offerta dalla meccatronica sta entrando prepotentemente in gioco e sostituirà molti posti di lavoro. Per capire quale sarà l'evoluzione credo occorra guardare quello che succede nel campo dei veicoli industriali.

kco
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » sab 05 ott 2019, 14:16:28

KittyHawk ha scritto:
kco ha scritto:La nuova sfida saranno strutture in carbonio prodotte in quantità massicce per supportare 60-100 aerei al mese e tutti si stanno preparando.

Non necessariamente il cambiamento sarà scandito dall'introduzione di nuovi materiali, bensì dalla crescente automatizzazione nelle fabbriche. Il tempo in cui gli operai facevano tutto a mano sta volgendo al termine anche nell'industria aeronautica. Ormai moltissimi anni fa Boeing iniziò a usare un enorme macchinario per pitturare le ali del 747 messe in verticale. In tempi più recenti per il 737 si è adottata la catena di lavoro fordista in continuo movimento. Pochi giorni fa Airbus ha inaugurato un sistema completamente automatizzato per l'assemblaggio delle strutture dell'A320 (https://www.airbus.com/newsroom/press-releases/en/2019/10/airbus-inaugurates-new-a320-structure-assembly-line-in-hamburg.html). Dove prima si avevano diversi operai al lavoro ora ci sono una ventina di robot che effettuano tutte le operazioni necessarie. Se uno ha in mente le immagini di Rosie the Riveter, o anche quelle del taglio delle lamiere del Concorde, si rende conto di come le cose siano cambiate.
L'automazione è finora rimasta abbastanza lontana dalle fabbriche aeronautiche a causa della, o grazie alla, produzione limitata. Ora grazie alla, o a causa della, crescente domanda e flessibilità offerta dalla meccatronica sta entrando prepotentemente in gioco e sostituirà molti posti di lavoro. Per capire quale sarà l'evoluzione credo occorra guardare quello che succede nel campo dei veicoli industriali.
Di sicuro l' automazione è parte del presente e del futuro. Ma non serve un nuovo aereo per cambiare standard di produzione.

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KittyHawk
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » sab 05 ott 2019, 14:29:06

Il nuovo aereo ti serve perché la cellula attuale (737) ha tante e tali limitazioni che è più conveniente ripartire da zero che cercare di realizzare un qualche accrocchio problematico. Accade in tutti i campi, dall'edilizia al software: tabula rasa e via col nuovo (che se ben fatto ti fa risparmiare e ti consente espansioni future). E nel progettare un nuovo velivolo puoi anche ottimizzarlo per una produzione automatizzata.

kco
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » sab 05 ott 2019, 17:36:09

KittyHawk ha scritto:Il nuovo aereo ti serve perché la cellula attuale (737) ha tante e tali limitazioni che è più conveniente ripartire da zero che cercare di realizzare un qualche accrocchio problematico. Accade in tutti i campi, dall'edilizia al software: tabula rasa e via col nuovo (che se ben fatto ti fa risparmiare e ti consente espansioni future). E nel progettare un nuovo velivolo puoi anche ottimizzarlo per una produzione automatizzata.
Se il tuo limite è fondamentalmente la propulsione non ti conviene farlo fino a quando non sarà pronta la nuova generazione di motori. Ovvero non domani.

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KittyHawk
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Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » sab 05 ott 2019, 20:06:08

kco ha scritto:
KittyHawk ha scritto:Il nuovo aereo ti serve perché la cellula attuale (737) ha tante e tali limitazioni che è più conveniente ripartire da zero che cercare di realizzare un qualche accrocchio problematico. Accade in tutti i campi, dall'edilizia al software: tabula rasa e via col nuovo (che se ben fatto ti fa risparmiare e ti consente espansioni future). E nel progettare un nuovo velivolo puoi anche ottimizzarlo per una produzione automatizzata.
Se il tuo limite è fondamentalmente la propulsione non ti conviene farlo fino a quando non sarà pronta la nuova generazione di motori. Ovvero non domani.

Il limite del 737 è principalmente l'altezza del carrello, che ha impedito di montare in posizione più corretta i motori del MAX e che limita l'angolo di rotazione. Aggiungi il fatto che la stiva non può caricare container (e se continui a incrementare numero di passeggeri e autonomia ti sono utili nelle operazioni a terra) più altre cosette e vedi che partire da un foglio bianco è più vantaggioso. Anche perché la progettazione e certificazione e messa in produzione di un nuovo modello di aereo richiede ben più di qualche settimana.


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