Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

tutto quello che riguarda i vettori
kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » sab 16 nov 2019, 11:15:06

https://theaircurrent.com/aviation-safe ... o-service/

Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » sab 16 nov 2019, 11:19:03

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/artic ... re-462267/

Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

Avatar utente
malpensante
Messaggi: 13212
Iscritto il: mar 20 nov 2007, 18:05:14
Località: Milano

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda malpensante » sab 16 nov 2019, 11:54:30

Il ritorno in servizio del MAX sembra sempre più remoto e le sue fortune commerciali sempre più improbabili.

Avatar utente
mattaus313
Messaggi: 1662
Iscritto il: sab 29 set 2018, 15:51:39

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda mattaus313 » sab 16 nov 2019, 13:57:30

Io spero vivamente che in Boeing stiano lavorando già ad un nuovo NB dal primo disastro, altrimenti oltre che per l'azienda è un bel disastro per tutta l'aviazione (Airbus a parte, che diventerebbe monopolista salvo considerare NB russocinesi)
"Because you needed a lot of capital in an airline, you needed to be where the financial markets were, and obviously that's New York"

Avatar utente
I-Alex
Moderatore
Messaggi: 26112
Iscritto il: sab 13 ott 2007, 01:13:01
Località: near Malpensa

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda I-Alex » sab 16 nov 2019, 19:20:52

Qui invece si ipotizzava Gennaio 2020, ovviamente è quello che spera Boeing

https://airwaysmag.com/manufacturer/boe ... uary-2020/

MIAMI — Boeing announced on Monday that it expects deliveries of its 737 MAX aircraft to resume next month, with full return to service possible by January 2020. The company’s stock rose 5% after the statement.
The announcement offers some degree of optimism regarding the model’s return to service after being grounded worldwide since March. Boeing stated last week that it expected U.S. regulators to approve the return of the aircraft for next month, with the Monday statement offering a more enhanced timeline.

Boeing has requested from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that deliveries recommence once the grounding has been lifted before new pilot training can be approved. If accommodated, this would allow the Chicago-based manufacturer to resume deliveries to customers in December.

The deliveries would be the first since March when the aircraft was grounded after the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash.
Production of the 737 MAX has continued at a delayed pace, but storage has been a cause for concern, with aircraft being kept in employee parking lots in Seattle.
Not only does Boeing wish to remove surplus aircraft from its lots, but the company is also hoping to recognize the revenue from these 737 MAX sales by fulfilling deliveries to customer airlines.


The Technical Advisory Board, an FAA panel created specifically to review the 737 MAX’s recertification process, recently found Boeing’s design changes to be safe and conforming to regulation. In addition, the company has completed a successful test of the new flight control software in simulation.
However, there are still several steps that must be taken in order to return the 737 MAX to service. Even after the plane’s re-certification flights, the FAA needs an additional 30 days to vet the aircraft before it can be ungrounded.
In addition, most major operators of the 737 MAX have expressed that they will likely require another month of training and adjustment before returning the model to service.
Boeing’s next step in the certification process is an extensive simulator session that will span several days and require input from an advanced team of global pilots.
The company will also require a software documentation audit before its certification flight, a step that has not been completed as of last week.

Given the extent of the project that remains to be completed, major airlines – including American and Southwest – have pushed back the return of the MAX to their fleets to early March 2020. As of now, the FAA has not offered a definitive timeline regarding the MAX’s recertification.
Malpensa airport user

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » mar 19 nov 2019, 08:50:29

Da copia di flight international in mio possesso

When will the 737 Max fly again? For months, it seemed one guess was as good as the next. You might as well have asked someone off the street.

No-one seemed to know, and with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) mute, Boeing’s “target” timelines came and went. After a while, they seemed like wishful thinking.

But in recent days signs suggest the end of the grounding may, with glacial slowness, be drawing near, perhaps before year-end.

On 11 November, Boeing released a “737 Max Progress Report” reiterating its belief the FAA will certificate the Max before year-end, possibly allowing deliveries in December.

Boeing says it has completed a simulator-based examination of Max software with the FAA. Next will come a pilot workload review, FAA certification flights and Boeing’s submission of final certification materials.

A group of global regulators will also review pilot training needs, Boeing says.

Wall Street welcomed the progress report and Boeing’s stock jumped 6%.

On the same day, asset manager Bernstein issued a paper reporting that many industry watchers likewise think the FAA is close.

“The general view in Hong Kong was that we should see certification by the FAA in Q4, with delivery possible,” said the report, written after two recent aviation events held in the Chinese territory. “There was finally a fair amount of optimism.”

Perhaps that spark could come at the Dubai air show. Don’t be surprised if Boeing pulls a rabbit out of the hat

An FAA sign-off would certainly mark a turning point in a saga that killed 346 people, cost Boeing billions – and its reputation – and raised questions about the way aircraft are certificated and how pilots are trained.

But Boeing’s problems will be far from solved. Regulators in other countries must approve the jet and months may pass before airlines run pilots through new training syllabuses. And that’s not to mention the huge parking lot of stockpiled 737 Max jets that need to be prepared, handed over and ferried to their new homes.

Boeing’s legal problems will continue, as likely will congressional and government investigations. And it badly needs new aircraft orders. Its Max orderbook has shrunk in recent months and widebody deals have been sparse.

Perhaps that spark could come at the Dubai air show. Don’t be surprised if Boeing’s sales team pulls a rabbit out of the hat at the event, replicating its deal with IAG at the Paris air show for 200 aircraft.

Sure, these jets will be at figures that are almost too good to refuse, but for Boeing, ­industry backing for the beleaguered narrowbody is clearly priceless.



Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » mar 19 nov 2019, 21:30:09

https://leehamnews.com/2019/11/18/ponti ... um=twitter

Curiosa la varietà dei problemi che incontra Boeing.

Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » mer 20 nov 2019, 08:34:07

Da copia di flight international in mio possesso

Boeing says 737 Max deliveries could resume in December after proposed modifications to the re-engined narrowbody passed the first of five key regulatory milestones.

However, Boeing’s assumption is based on the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) lifting its grounding of the aircaft.

The FAA says that it will not commit to a timeline for the rescinding of the Max flight ban, and the airframer admits that regulators across the globe may approve “a phased approach” to return aircraft to service.

Boeing’s optimism that it is likely to gain FAA approval was bolstered by the agency’s announcement that it had ­completed “a multi-day eCab simulator evaluation” to “ensure the overall software system performs its ­intended function, both normally and in the presence of system failures”.

The next steps will be a “simulator session with airline pilots to assess human factors and crew workload under various test conditions”, followed by an FAA ­certification flight test, ­Boeing says. The airframer will then have to submit its final Max aircraft software modifications to the FAA.

After that, a Joint Operational Evaluation Board representing several regulatory agencies will conduct another multi-day simulator session with pilots to determine training requirements.

The FAA’s Flight Standardization Board must then publish a ­report on the proposed training, review any comments from the public, and then approve the training requirements.

The impact of the grounding and shipment suspension is all too visible in Boeing’s October order and delivery figures.

During the period, total commercial aircraft net orders for the year slipped by 11, from 56 to 45, as the removal of 21 aircraft from the backlog was only partially offset by 10 new orders.

Monthly deliveries also dropped to 20 aircraft, down from 25 in September.

The 10 aircraft orders logged in October included five 787-9s for lessor Air Lease, two 777Fs for Lufthansa Cargo and orders by unidentified customers for two 787-9s and a single 737 Max.

That solitary Max order actually represents a delivery position swap between two customers, Boeing notes.

Boeing cut 21 aircraft from its backlog during the period, ­including 15 737 Max aircraft that Air Lease converted to the five 787-9s.

The company says its 20 aircraft deliveries in October included a single 737NG-based P-8A ­Poseidon surveillance aircraft to the US Navy, one 747-8F, three 767s, three 777s and 12 787s.

By comparison, the airframer shipped a total of 57 aircraft in October 2018.



Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » lun 25 nov 2019, 08:37:36

Da copia di flight international in mio possesso


Boeing entered Dubai in subdued mood, saying little about the 737 Max other than to emphasise that the priority is a safe return to service for the grounded twinjet. 

However, it was significantly boosted at the show by renewed order momentum for the re-engined narrowbody. 

Stan Deal, speaking at his first major industry event since taking over the chief executive role at Boeing Commercial Airplanes in late October, reiterated the manufacturer’s commitment “to safely return the Max into service”. 

However, Deal believes this milestone will happen soon. Announcing a follow-on order of 10 Max 8s from SunExpress, he says: “This is a vote of confidence for the 737 Max that we will return to service shortly.”

While acknowledging that the final return to flight schedule will be down to the regulators, Randy Tinseth, Boeing’s vice-president of commercial marketing, says the airframer is aiming for the aircraft to be flying again within two to three months.

But customers appear to be returning to the Max, after a period where orders had dried up.  Aside from the SunExpress deal, Boeing signed another firm agreement for 20 aircraft, and Air Astana unveiled a tentative agreement for 30 units to be operated by its new low-cost arm FlyArystan



Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » gio 12 dic 2019, 12:35:18

https://leehamnews.com/2019/12/11/with- ... um=twitter

Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

I-GABE
Messaggi: 1459
Iscritto il: sab 23 mag 2009, 18:35:41
Località: London, UK

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda I-GABE » gio 12 dic 2019, 14:13:45

L’EASA quindi dice non prima dell’estate... mi sa che veramente ci sarà da capire il “se”, piuttosto che il “quando”!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » ven 13 dic 2019, 08:43:36

https://www.flightglobal.com/airlines/r ... 33.article

Passiamo all ottimismo di FR

Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

I-GABE
Messaggi: 1459
Iscritto il: sab 23 mag 2009, 18:35:41
Località: London, UK

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda I-GABE » ven 13 dic 2019, 10:01:21

A me sembra che sia una sparata quella del planning day by day.

easyMXP
Messaggi: 4372
Iscritto il: mer 20 ago 2008, 16:00:52

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda easyMXP » ven 13 dic 2019, 11:01:19

A me sembra che sia una sparata quella del planning day by day.
Ma no figurati, loro a mezzanotte fanno una camminata sul piazzale, segnano le marche su un taccuino e poi estraggono a sorte gli aerei che partono il giorno dopo.
Fanno lo stesso con i turni del personale e i cicli di manutenzione, cosa credi?

I-GABE
Messaggi: 1459
Iscritto il: sab 23 mag 2009, 18:35:41
Località: London, UK

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda I-GABE » ven 13 dic 2019, 11:32:54

Ti sei dimenticato di dire che decidono se far pilotare ai piloti o agli addetti alle pulizie sul momento, a seconda di chi e' disponibile! :green:

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » ven 13 dic 2019, 18:01:40

https://theaircurrent.com/aviation-safe ... ax-return/

Passiamo a note un po più pessimistiche che danno aprile. Non prima. Però boeing pare abbia consegnato una relazione delle modifiche. Adesso la palla dovrebbe essere in mano a FAA e qualcosa di più si dovrebbe sapere nelle prossime settimane.

Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » ven 13 dic 2019, 18:06:17

https://www.flightglobal.com/air-transp ... 44.article

Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

kco
Messaggi: 4683
Iscritto il: sab 05 gen 2008, 09:01:18

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda kco » lun 16 dic 2019, 07:58:56

https://mobile.reuters.com/article/amp/ ... ssion=true



Inviato dal mio ANE-LX1 utilizzando Tapatalk

KittyHawk
Messaggi: 4900
Iscritto il: mer 11 giu 2008, 23:29:09
Località: Milano

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » lun 16 dic 2019, 10:24:17

Devono aver finito gli aeroporti dove parcheggiare i velivoli completati e anche la cassa non è in ottima salute.
Troppo ottimismo da parte di Boeing nelle previsioni di rientro in servizio del MAX. Come riporta la Reuters, ci sono ancora una dozzina di traguardi intermedi da raggiungere per completare il progetto e ormai si parla di marzo (non una è novità, esperti avevano indicato già parecchie settimane fa la primavera 2020 come data ragionevole per veder di nuovo volare il MAX).

Con questi ritardi si prospetta un'altra Summer a rischio.

Avatar utente
malpensante
Messaggi: 13212
Iscritto il: mar 20 nov 2007, 18:05:14
Località: Milano

Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda malpensante » lun 16 dic 2019, 10:53:00

La cassa è piena, ma più aerei fai e più ne dovrai modificare una volta che le modifiche verranno approvate. Finora Boeing ha sostenuto la linea che i problemi ai MAX fossero non gravi e temporanei, adesso la realtà prende il controllo.

Avatar utente
mattaus313
Messaggi: 1662
Iscritto il: sab 29 set 2018, 15:51:39

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda mattaus313 » lun 16 dic 2019, 12:36:19

Per me è il MAX è morto, o meglio, non c'è più niente da fare.

Lieto eventualmente di essere smentito (spero presto) da Boeing.
"Because you needed a lot of capital in an airline, you needed to be where the financial markets were, and obviously that's New York"

Avatar utente
wrth
Messaggi: 760
Iscritto il: sab 07 giu 2008, 12:56:19
Località: Castano Primo

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda wrth » lun 16 dic 2019, 13:40:42

Per me è il MAX è morto, o meglio, non c'è più niente da fare.

Lieto eventualmente di essere smentito (spero presto) da Boeing.
Il fatto è che Boeing ha un portafoglio ordini di diverse migliaia di esemplari, diverse centinaia già consegnate e altrettante prodotte. Abbandonare il progetto, penso, sia una catastrofe e probabilmente si tratterebbe del più grosso flop industriale di sempre. Purtroppo con più passa il tempo senza avere lo spiraglio di una data certa per il ritorno in volo, più prende corpo la possibilità che il progetto possa essere abbandonato, con costi inimmaginabili... Probabilmente per limitare le perdite si inventeranno qualcosa...chissà. Certo che la questione è comunque intrigante.

MXP3000
Messaggi: 1021
Iscritto il: sab 29 dic 2007, 15:53:46
Località: DFW metroplex - USA

Re: Precipitato un B737 Max 8 di ET, conseguenze sul mezzo e sul mercato

Messaggio da leggereda MXP3000 » lun 16 dic 2019, 21:55:12

Per me è il MAX è morto, o meglio, non c'è più niente da fare.
più passa il tempo senza avere lo spiraglio di una data certa per il ritorno in volo, più prende corpo la possibilità che il progetto possa essere abbandonato, con costi inimmaginabili... Probabilmente per limitare le perdite si inventeranno qualcosa...chissà.
Piu' che altro se il 737 MAX non ritornasse in servizio le perdite sarebbero cosi' alte che Boeing chiuderebbe baracca e burattini. A meno di sostegno del governo.
MXP3000... sognando un hub...

Avatar utente
malpensante
Messaggi: 13212
Iscritto il: mar 20 nov 2007, 18:05:14
Località: Milano

Messaggio da leggereda malpensante » lun 16 dic 2019, 23:35:17

BUSINESS NEWS DECEMBER 16, 2019 / 2:21 PM

Boeing will halt 737 production in January, following two fatal MAX crashes

Eric M. Johnson, David Shepardson

SEATTLE/WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Boeing Co said on Monday it will halt 737 commercial production in January as the grounding of its best-selling MAX following two fatal crashes within five months looks set to last well into next year, a move that could hit its global supply chain and the U.S. economy.

The decision, made by Boeing’s board after a two-day meeting in Chicago, follows news last week that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) would not approve the plane’s return to service before 2020.

Boeing will not lay off any employees during the production freeze, it said.

The 737 MAX has been grounded since March after two crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia killed 346 people within five months, costing the plane manufacturer more than $9 billion so far.

Until now Boeing has continued to produce 737 MAX jets at a rate of 42 per month and purchase parts from suppliers at a rate of up to 52 units per month, even though deliveries are frozen until regulators approve the aircraft to fly commercially again.

Halting production will ease a severe squeeze on cash tied up in roughly 375 undelivered planes, but only at the risk of causing industrial problems when Boeing tries to return to normal, industry sources said. Supply chains are already under strain due to record demand and abrupt changes in factory speed can cause snags.

In 1997, Boeing announced a hit of $2.6 billion including hundreds of millions to deal with factory inefficiencies after it was forced to suspend output of its 737 and 747 lines due to supply chain problems.

Aside from additional 737 MAX charges, disruptions to production could also result in layoffs or furloughs of some of the 12,000 workers at Boeing’s 737 factory south of Seattle. Boeing said it will continue P8 production of the military version of the 737.

Boeing’s shares closed down 4% on Monday and fell 1% after hours. Shares in Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc, its biggest supplier, closed down 2%.

Spirit, which makes the MAX fuselage along with other parts such as pylons, said on Monday it would work with Boeing to understand any changes to the production rate.

Analysts highlighted Safran SA and Senior Plc as other suppliers that could experience disruption impacts.

Airlines with 737 MAX jets and orders also face added uncertainty after already scaling back flying schedules and delaying growth plans due to the grounding. Southwest Airlines Co, the largest 737 MAX customer, said last week it had reached a confidential compensation agreement with Boeing for a portion of a projected $830 million hit to operating income in 2019 from the grounding.


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-boei ... SKBN1YK18Q

Avatar utente
malpensante
Messaggi: 13212
Iscritto il: mar 20 nov 2007, 18:05:14
Località: Milano

Messaggio da leggereda malpensante » mar 17 dic 2019, 00:01:19

Boeing will halt Renton assembly lines, but no layoffs for employees
Dec. 16, 2019 at 1:57 pm Updated Dec. 16, 2019 at 2:53 pm

By Dominic Gates
Seattle Times aerospace reporter

Nine months after the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) grounded the 737 MAX, Boeing finally pulled the plug on the jet’s production Monday. The company announced it’s temporarily halting the assembly lines in Renton from January, with no timeline defined for a restart.

However, there is good news for the 12,000-strong Renton workforce: Boeing will preserve their jobs by keeping some on 737 work and redeploying the rest to other facilities in the region.

“During this time, it is our plan that affected employees will continue 737-related work, or be temporarily assigned to other teams in Puget Sound,” Boeing said in a statement. “As we have throughout the 737 MAX grounding, we will keep our customers, employees, and supply chain top of mind as we continue to assess appropriate actions.”

“We believe this decision is least disruptive to maintaining long-term production system and supply chain health,” the statement said.

In a message that went out Monday afternoon to Renton employees, the new head of Boeing Commercial Airplanes Stan Deal said it was “a decision not taken lightly.”

“Throughout the MAX grounding, we continued to produce and store airplanes because we felt this was in the best interests of our teammates, our customers, the production system and supplier partners,” Deal wrote. He said the shift to suspending production was driven by “the extension of certification into 2020, the uncertainty about the timing and conditions of return to service and global training approvals among other factors.”

The company said that during the slowdown in production over the past nine months, it’s been able to fix issues with the production system and allow suppliers that were lagging to catch up, and it intends to have some employees working on efforts to sustain those gains.

A Boeing insider briefed on the decision said the Renton factory’s manufacturing operation is Boeing’s “crown jewel.”

It’s an amazing facility,” he said. “You try to keep the team together as best you can. They all still have jobs.”

“I think it’s the right thing to do,” he added. “We care about our workforce.”

The insider said Boeing didn’t announce any timeline for the production stoppage because it has no control over the jet’s return to service. “The FAA has a lot more control than we do,” he said. “When it’s time to get back, we will.”

Though Boeing had been hoping for approval to fly the MAX again by year end, last week FAA Administrator Steve Dickson pushed that expectation into next year and told told Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg to back away from public statements suggesting otherwise.

Officials privately identified mid-February as the new target for FAA clearance. Assuming no further slips in the schedule, that still extends the MAX’s grounding to almost a year. The MAX was grounded worldwide on March 13 following two fatal crashes in just over four months killed 346 people.

Boeing’s statement said the decision to stop production “is driven by a number of factors, including the extension of certification into 2020, the uncertainty about the timing and conditions of return to service and global training approvals, and the importance of ensuring that we can prioritize the delivery of stored aircraft.”

“We will continue to assess our progress towards return to service milestones and make determinations about resuming production and deliveries accordingly,” the statement added.

n Deal’s message to employees, he wrote that “over the next few weeks, we will continue to assess the appropriate duration of the production suspension, work with our suppliers to ensure plans are in place to resume production and eventual rate increases, and prepare to restart deliveries once the grounding is lifted.”

Deal said the halt to production means Boeing “will prioritize the delivery of completed aircraft rather than feeding more airplanes into production.”

He said that “will put our system in a better position to recover and more efficiently deliver completed airplanes once we safely return the 737 MAX to service,” he wrote.

The decision was finalized Monday at a meeting of the company’s board in Chicago.

The company’s statement left many details unanswered, in particular the impact on suppliers. With the stoppage in Renton, parts of the 737 supply chain may also grind to a halt, which is potentially very disruptive to the finely tuned global production system.

In a statement after Boeing’s announcement, GE, which supplies the MAX’s new LEAP engines, said it’s partnering with Boeing and its suppliers “to mitigate the impact of the temporary slowdown of the 737 MAX production, while protecting the company’s ability to accelerate production as needed in the future.”

Anticipating Boeing’s announcement, the market slammed the jetmaker’s share price Monday even as the Dow reached a record high. The stock fell nearly $15, or 4.29% for the day, closing at $327.


https://www.seattletimes.com/business/b ... employees/


Torna a “COMPAGNIE AEREE”

Chi c’è in linea

Visitano il forum: Google Adsense [Bot] e 21 ospiti