Meno piloti necessari per il lungo raggio

le news relative a mezzi volanti, strutture a terra e aviazione
KittyHawk
Messaggi: 5482
Iscritto il: mer 11 giu 2008, 23:29:09
Località: Milano

Meno piloti necessari per il lungo raggio

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » gio 17 giu 2021, 07:28:57

È uno scenario che mi ero immaginato diverso tempo fa e che potrebbe diventare realtà prima di quanto pensassi.
Ci sarà da vedere come la prenderanno i passeggeri e ancora prima mettere a punto una serie di misure di sicurezza dirette e indirette, ma la strada probabilmente è tracciata. Magari si inizierà sperimentalmente coi soli voli full cargo, per poi passare ai voli di linea appena si sarà affermata la fiducia nel nuovo modo di operare.

Cinquant'anni fa pensare di attivare voli di linea attraverso l'Atlantico e il Pacifico con un bireattore sarebbe stata considerata una pazzia, ora lo è immaginare di progettare un nuovo aereo passeggeri con più di due motori. I tempi cambiano.
EXCLUSIVE Cathay working with Airbus on single-pilot system for long-haul

PARIS, June 16 (Reuters) - Cathay Pacific (0293.HK) is working with Airbus (AIR.PA) to introduce “reduced crew” long-haul flights with a sole pilot in the cockpit much of the time, industry sources told Reuters.

The programme, known within Airbus as Project Connect, aims to certify its A350 jet for single-pilot operations during high-altitude cruise, starting in 2025 on Cathay passenger flights, the sources said.

High hurdles remain on the path to international acceptance. Once cleared, longer flights would become possible with a pair of pilots alternating rest breaks, instead of the three or four currently needed to maintain at least two in the cockpit.

That promises savings for airlines, amid uncertainty over the post-pandemic economics of intercontinental flying. But it is likely to encounter resistance from pilots already hit by mass layoffs, and safety concerns about aircraft automation.

Lufthansa (LHAG.DE) has also worked on the single-pilot programme but currently has no plans to use it, a spokesman for the German carrier told Reuters.

Cathay Pacific Airways confirmed its involvement but said no decision had been made on eventual deployment.

"While we are engaging with Airbus in the development of the concept of reduced crew operations, we have not committed in any way to being the launch customer," the Hong Kong carrier said.

Commercial implementation would first require extensive testing, regulatory approval and pilot training with "absolutely no compromise on safety", Cathay said.

"The appropriateness and effectiveness of any such rollout as well as (the) overall cost-benefit analysis (will) ultimately depend on how the pandemic plays out."

It added: "Having said that, we will continue to engage with Airbus and to support development of the concept."

Airbus has previously disclosed plans to add single-pilot capability to the A350, but the airlines' participation had not been reported. Work has resumed after the COVID-19 crisis paused the programme, Chief Test Pilot Christophe Cail said.

"We've proven over decades we can enhance safety by putting the latest technology in aircraft," Cail told Reuters, declining to identify project partners. "As for any design evolution, we are working with airlines."

VITAL SIGNS

Safe deployment will require constant monitoring of the solo pilot's alertness and vital signs by on-board systems, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) has said.

If the flight encounters a problem or the pilot flying is incapacitated, the resting copilot can be summoned within minutes. Both remain in the cockpit for take-off and landing.

"Typically on long-haul flights when you're at cruise altitude there's very little happening in the cockpit," EASA chief Patrick Ky told a German press briefing in January.

"It makes sense to say OK, instead of having two in the cockpit, we can have one in the cockpit, the other one taking a rest, provided we're implementing technical solutions which make sure that if the single one falls asleep or has any problem, there won't be any unsafe conditions."

Pilot groups have voiced alarm.

"We struggle to understand the rationale," said Otjan de Bruijn, head of the European Cockpit Association representing EU pilots.

Invoking the 737 MAX crisis, which exposed Boeing's (BA.N) inappropriate links to U.S. regulators, De Bruijn said the programme's cost-cutting approach "could lead to higher risks".

Single-pilot operations, currently limited to planes with up to nine passengers, would need backing from U.N. aviation body ICAO and countries whose airspace they cross. China's support is key to any Cathay deployment.

EASA plans consultations this year and certification work in 2022, while acknowledging "significant risk" to the 2025 launch date, a spokesman said.

In a closed-door industry briefing this year, the agency suggested reduced-crew flights would begin with a single operator, according to notes of the meeting reviewed by Reuters.

EMERGENCY DESCENT

Airbus has designed an A350 autopilot upgrade and flight warning system changes to help a lone pilot manage failures, sources close to the project said.

The mid-sized plane is suitable because of its "emergency descent" feature that quickly reduces altitude without pilot input in the event of cabin depressurisation.

Proponents suggest single-pilot operations may be accepted by a flying public used to crew leaving the cockpit for bathroom breaks. They also point to higher error rates from human pilots than automated systems.

Both arguments miss the point, according to a source close to Lufthansa - who said the airline's executives were advised last year that the programme could not meet safety goals.

Flying solo for hours is a "completely different story", the source said, citing the 2009 AF447 disaster as an example of malfunctions occurring in cruise. The Air France (AIRF.PA) A330's copilots lost control after its speed sensors failed over the Atlantic, while the captain was resting.

"Airbus would have had to make sure every situation can be handled autonomously without any pilot input for 15 minutes," the source said. "And that couldn't be guaranteed."

Lufthansa has not withdrawn from Project Connect and remains involved as an adviser, its spokesman said.

While the airline has no plans to deploy single-pilot operations, he added, "the suggestion that Lufthansa was an essential part of the project and then pulled back is not true."

Single-pilot capability would add an A350 sales argument, experts say, and rival Boeing lacks an equivalent model with sufficient automation.

Filippo Tomasello, a former EASA official, said the payroll and accommodation savings for long-haul crew would not be lost on airlines.

"COVID may end up accelerating this evolution because it's putting tremendous economic pressure on aviation," Tomasello predicted.

“If EASA certifies this solution, airlines will use it.”
https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/exclusive-cathay-working-with-airbus-single-pilot-system-long-haul-2021-06-16/

Avatar utente
I-Alex
Site Admin
Messaggi: 26824
Iscritto il: sab 13 ott 2007, 01:13:01
Località: near Malpensa

Re: Meno piloti necessari per il lungo raggio

Messaggio da leggereda I-Alex » gio 17 giu 2021, 22:52:28

speriamo di no
Malpensa airport user

Avatar utente
D960
Messaggi: 1498
Iscritto il: mer 17 ago 2016, 10:53:17

Re: Meno piloti necessari per il lungo raggio

Messaggio da leggereda D960 » ven 18 giu 2021, 13:00:08

Per me diventa esagerato.
AHO-BLQ-BGY-CAG-DUB-FCO-GOA-GRO-KBP-LIN-MXP-MUC-OLB-PMF-PSA-STN-TBS-TPS-TRN-TRS-TSF-VCE

A Milén si va a Linate per i nazionali, a Bergamo per gli internazionali e a Malpensa per gli intercontinentali e i charter

Ale330
Messaggi: 159
Iscritto il: dom 02 ott 2016, 14:00:59

Re: Meno piloti necessari per il lungo raggio

Messaggio da leggereda Ale330 » ven 18 giu 2021, 14:06:46

Si sono già dimenticati di Germanwings e AF447?
O dell'MH370 dove è probabilmente un altro caso di suicidio del pilota? Molto perplesso

KittyHawk
Messaggi: 5482
Iscritto il: mer 11 giu 2008, 23:29:09
Località: Milano

Re: Meno piloti necessari per il lungo raggio

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » ven 18 giu 2021, 17:12:04

Nel volo AF447 c'erano 3 piloti. Nel caso di Germanwings e altri, non solo l'MH370, i piloti erano due, eppure il pilota con istinti suicidi ce l'ha fatta. Su questo punto tornerò alla fine.

Partiamo dal personale di condotta. Una volta c'era bisogno di 4 persone: comandante, primo ufficiale, motorista e navigatore/operatore radio. Poi si è passati a 3 e il motorista era ancora presente sui Caravelle e B727, aerei di corto e medio raggio. Nessun aereo recente, a memoria, ha bisogno di più di due persone in cabina. Ci sono passeggeri o aviation geek che si lamentano della situazione? Non credo.
Ormai, tranne la fase di decollo e di atterraggio, il volo è completamente controllato dagli automatismi. Grazie al GPS anche gli errori di navigazione dei vecchi sistemi sono scomparsi.
Alcune compagnie permettono che, in crociera, i piloti dormano alternativamente, tanto non c'è gran che da fare. E se sono tutti e due svegli magari ogni tanto c'è bisogno di andare in bagno. Già adesso, perciò, non ci sono sempre in cabina due piloti svegli e operativi.
Il problema dei piloti si pone sui voli che superano le 8/9 ore, dove occorre un equipaggio rinforzato. Ora se, al posto di imbarcare uno o due piloti in più rispetto ai 2 standard, si operasse durante la crociera un collegamento satellitare con un pilota remoto, in cabina ci sarebbero sempre due piloti operativi. I droni sono ormai routine quotidiana e applicare la tecnologia militare al settore civile non dovrebbe essere un problema. Decollo e atterraggio verrebbero gestiti in ogni caso dai due piloti a bordo.

Torniamo ai piloti suicidi. Diversi velivoli ad alte prestazioni hanno un pulsante di emergenza in caso di disorientamento spaziale: il velivolo viene riportato in volo livellato a una quota e velocità di sicurezza. Perché i velivoli di linea non sono ancora stati dotati di un simile pulsante posto fuori della cabina di pilotaggio e attivabile, tramite codice, dagli AV o dal pilota chiuso fuori? Nel caso di un unico pilota in cabina incapacitato o con istinti suicidi ci sarebbe il tempo per tentare di entrare in cabina e risolvere il problema. E se si fosse un po' più audaci - la tecnologia c'è già, si tratta solo di implementarla - lo stesso bottone potrebbe far atterrare automaticamente e in sicurezza il velivolo nell'aeroporto più vicino.

easyMXP
Messaggi: 4684
Iscritto il: mer 20 ago 2008, 16:00:52

Re: Meno piloti necessari per il lungo raggio

Messaggio da leggereda easyMXP » ven 18 giu 2021, 17:51:06

KittyHawk ha scritto: ven 18 giu 2021, 17:12:04Partiamo dal personale di condotta. Una volta c'era bisogno di 4 persone: comandante, primo ufficiale, motorista e navigatore/operatore radio. Poi si è passati a 3 e il motorista era ancora presente sui Caravelle e B727, aerei di corto e medio raggio. Nessun aereo recente, a memoria, ha bisogno di più di due persone in cabina. Ci sono passeggeri o aviation geek che si lamentano della situazione? Non credo
Fino a due la ridondanza è mantenuta, sotto no.
KittyHawk ha scritto: ven 18 giu 2021, 17:12:04Ormai, tranne la fase di decollo e di atterraggio, il volo è completamente controllato dagli automatismi. Grazie al GPS anche gli errori di navigazione dei vecchi sistemi sono scomparsi.
Quando tutto funziona non c'è problema.
KittyHawk ha scritto: ven 18 giu 2021, 17:12:04Ora se, al posto di imbarcare uno o due piloti in più rispetto ai 2 standard, si operasse durante la crociera un collegamento satellitare con un pilota remoto, in cabina ci sarebbero sempre due piloti operativi. I droni sono ormai routine quotidiana e applicare la tecnologia militare al settore civile non dovrebbe essere un problema.
Tra osservare una situazione guardando le telemetrie, e osservarla guardando le telemetrie e sentendo in diretta cosa succede (rumori, accelerazioni, vibrazioni, fumo o fiamme dai motori, buchi sulle ali,...) c'è comunque una differenza. I droni se cadono buttano via qualche decina di miloni di euro, magari anche meno. Gli aerei civili se cadono ammazzano centinaia di persone.
KittyHawk ha scritto: ven 18 giu 2021, 17:12:04Torniamo ai piloti suicidi. Diversi velivoli ad alte prestazioni hanno un pulsante di emergenza in caso di disorientamento spaziale: il velivolo viene riportato in volo livellato a una quota e velocità di sicurezza. Perché i velivoli di linea non sono ancora stati dotati di un simile pulsante posto fuori della cabina di pilotaggio e attivabile, tramite codice, dagli AV o dal pilota chiuso fuori? Nel caso di un unico pilota in cabina incapacitato o con istinti suicidi ci sarebbe il tempo per tentare di entrare in cabina e risolvere il problema. E se si fosse un po' più audaci - la tecnologia c'è già, si tratta solo di implementarla - lo stesso bottone potrebbe far atterrare automaticamente e in sicurezza il velivolo nell'aeroporto più vicino.
Qualunque pulsante fuori dalla cabina di pilotaggio espone al rischio terroristi. L'isolamento della cabina è la chiave della sicurezza. L'attivazione tramite codice non è una vera sicurezza, basta minacciare o torturare chi sa il codice in molti casi per farselo dire.

Con questo non voglio dire che il pilota singolo in crociera non sia fattibile, ma la sua introduzione non è così semplice da far digerire.

KittyHawk
Messaggi: 5482
Iscritto il: mer 11 giu 2008, 23:29:09
Località: Milano

Re: Meno piloti necessari per il lungo raggio

Messaggio da leggereda KittyHawk » ven 18 giu 2021, 20:17:15

@easyMXP
Se si dovessero guastare tutti gli automatismi di un velivolo pensi che due piloti sarebbero risolutivi? C'è qualche pilota che è in grado di gestire i motori come facevano i vecchi motoristi, sempre ammesso che sia tecnicamente possibile? Se saltassero tutti i sistemi di comunicazione e di navigazione quanti sono i piloti in attività in grado di fare il punto e tracciare la rotta e specialmente dove troverebbero in cabina gli strumenti necessari? Quanti dei piloti di linea sono ancora in grado di navigare agevolmente con bussola magnetica e orologio?
Un mio docente universitario diceva che un buon pilota di linea era quello che, nei giorni festivi, saliva su un Cessna 150 e tornava a volare, perché pilotare un velivolo commerciale non era molto diverso dal guidare un autobus. Ed era un tempo in cui tutta la strumentazione sui velivoli di linea era analogica e il Concorde era appena entrato in linea (pensa quanto tempo fa :P ).
Piccolo OT: l'accademia di Annapolis (USA) ha dovuto chiedere che la nostra Accademia Navale fornisse loro un nostro ufficiale per insegnare ai cadetti come usare il sestante, perché nessun ufficiale di marina americano lo sapeva fare e tanto meno insegnare.
Questo solo per dire che comunque siamo completamente assuefatti agli automatismi e che sotto questo punto di vista le cose non cambierebbero.

Come riconosci, il pilota singolo in crociera è fattibile. Temi tuttavia che la sua introduzione non sia facilmente accettabile. Secondo me, invece, in un mondo in cui tanti si fidano di Alexa (ci sarebbe moltissimo da dire in proposito), la cosa non è così difficile.

Infine sul problema di come evitare i piloti suicidi. Sinceramente non capisco l'obiezione a un sistema esterno che riporti il velivolo in condizioni di volo sicuro: volo rettilineo a quota di sicurezza rispetto al suolo e velocità né vicina allo stallo né superiore a quella di manovra. Un sistema che non aprirebbe la porta. I terroristi, anche avessero il codice, come potrebbero mettere così in pericolo l'aeromobile in volo? Sarebbe come dire di togliere i freni di emergenza dai vagoni ferroviari perché un terrorista potrebbe fermare il treno in aperta campagna. E poi?


Torna a “HANGAR - Aerei, strutture e altre news aeronautiche”

Chi c’è in linea

Visitano il forum: Nessuno e 3 ospiti